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Archives: June 2012

Blueberry Pecan Scones

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by The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast

Morning Treat--Blueberry Scone

Blueberries are in abundance during the month of June, so our signature dish this month at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast is Blueberry Pecan Scones.  Easy to make, delicious to eat, and good for you this recipe is one you will enjoy.  We are growing blueberry bushes in our organic garden and hope to be able to harvest our own blueberries next summer.  This month, as we did last month, we visited a farm near Lynchburg, Virginia to pick them fresh.

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar, divided
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup cold butter, unsalted
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup fresh blueberries
  • 1/3 cup chopped pecans, toasted
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
  • 1 egg white, lightly beaten

 

In a large bowl combine the flour, 1/4 cup sugar, baking powder and salt.  Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs.

In a small bowl whisk the egg, milk and vanilla; add to crumb mixture.  Stir in blueberries, pecans and lemon peel just until moistened.

Turn onto a floured surface, knead 6-8 times.  Pat into an 8-inch circle; cut into eight wedges.  Separate wedges and place 2 inches apart on a greased baking sheet.

Brush with egg white and sprinkle with remaining sugar.  Bake at 375 for 18-20 minutes or until lightly browned.  Serve warm.

Makes 8 large scones.

At The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast we bake these scones in a mini-scone pan, found in kitchen specialty stores or at kingarthurflour.com, and serve them as our Amuse-Bouche course at the beginning of our legendary four-course breakfast.  The smaller pan makes 16 2″x3″ mini-scones.  We have used white sugar crystals or sprinkling sugar, found at kitchen specialty stores or wherever cake baking supplies are sold, as the final step, adjusting the amount of granulated sugar used in the recipe accordingly.  You may use frozen blueberries.  If using frozen blueberries do not thaw to avoid discoloring the batter.  To toast the pecans, place them on a baking sheet in a 350 oven for 7-10 minutes, or until fragrant and a medium-brown color.  Watch them carefully as they burn easily.  Chop them after they are toasted.  These scones are great served alone or when accompanied by Lemon Curd, found in the baking isle at most grocery stores, for a taste balance of sweet and citrus-tart.

James River Batteau Festival

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The James River Batteau Festival, in its 27th year, launched this past Saturday from Percival’s Island in downtown Lynchburg, VA.  A fleet of nineteen boats pushed off from the banks of the river amidst cannon blasts, cheering and applause.

The festival is an 8-day, 120 mile trip down the James River from Lynchburg to Richmond.  The launch from Lynchburg celebrates the unique history of these flat-bottomed boats, invented in Amherst, which once carried goods and passengers in the early 8th century.  With a draw of only about 6-8-inches these boats carried several thousand pounds of tobacco or other goods on the shallow James River.  The batteau carried goods until about 1840 when improvements along the river made navigation by larger vessels possible.

For the first time in 5 years this year’s festival included traditional crafters and artisans, historical games, activities and exhibits, storytelling, live music, a bass fishing tournament, a canoe and kayak race and a Monacan Youth Powwow Dance.  Due to the resounding success of this year’s festival, be on the lookout for the announcement, next year, for the launch date in June 2013.

 

Flag Day

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Old Glory

Flag Day is celebrated on June 14.  It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, which happened that day by resolution of the Second Continental Congress in 1777.   John Adams introduced the following resolution before the Continental Congress, meeting at Philadelphia, PA: “Resolved, that the flag of the thirteen United States shall have thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing a new constellation.”

Relax on our huge wrap around front porch

In 1914, President Woodrow Wison declared June 14 “Flag Day.”  In 1949 Congress passed legislation asking President Harry S. Truman to issue an annual proclamation calling for the observance of the hoilday.

The week of June 14 is designated as “National Flag Week.”  During National Flag Week, the president will issue a proclamation urging all U.S. citizens to fly the American flag for the duration of that week.  The flag should also be displayed on all government buildings.

At  The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, in Lynchburg, VA, we fly two flags from our front porch.  One is the flag of fifty stars and stripes.  The other is a flag of thirty-eight stars and stripes, representing the states of the union in 1878 when our house was completed.  The Watts family would have flown such a flag.

Enjoy your stay!

Flag Day is not an official federal holiday, although many towns and cities throughout the United States celebrate this day with parades, speeches and other forms of patriotic expression.  Perhaps the oldest continuing Flag Day parade is at Fairfield, Washington.  Beginning in 1909 or 1910, Fairfield has held a parade every year since, with the possible exception of 1918, and celebrated the “Centennial” parade in 2010.

We look forward to observing flags being flown throughout Lynchburg and Central Virginia.

 

 

In 1914 President Woodrow Wilson dubbed June 14 “Flag Day.”  In 1949 Congress passed legislation asking the president to issue an annual proclamation calling for the observance of the holiday.

Soap Box Derby 2012

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Soap Box Derby photo by The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast

Drivers at the starting line

On Saturday, June 2nd, the Hill City Classic Derby took place at Falwell Aviation.  22 drivers competed in the double elimination competition, ten in stock and 12 in superstock.  The double elimination format meant that some of the drivers raced down the hill as many as six times. 

Since there aren’t any engines in soapbox derby the difference between stock and uper stock is the size of the driver. Stock cars accommodate drivers in the 10-13 age range.  In superstock the cockpit is larger to accommodate drivers aged 13-17.

Fallwell Airport runway by The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast

Drivers reach speeds in excess of 30 MPH

The drivers must make their cars, using a hard plastic kit that weighs about 60 pounds.  According to two of the drivers, the hardest part of building the car is getting the steering cables installed correctly.  Most of the drivers had assistance from a helpful adult.

A tight race by The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast

A Tight Race--Superstock Class

In the 1950’s and 60’s the Derby was a fixture in downtown Lynchburg, the course taking advantage of various hilly streets.  This year, Falwell Aviation was chosen as the sight of the derby due to the layout of the land and the slope of the runway.  Without an engine, gravity plays a vital role in the running of the race.  The track was about 100 yards (the length of a football field) and the drivers reached a speed in excess of 30 miles per hour.

The stock and superstock winners, Fulton Fitzgerald and Nathan Hansen, respectively, will travel to Akron, Ohio to compete in the National Soap Box Derby on July 21st.  The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast wishes the best of luck to Lynchburg’s representatives!

The derby was such a success the organizers plan to offer the event again next year.