Check Availability | 434-846-1388

Blog

I’ll Never be Hungry Again

Posted on

The Renaissance Theatre, in downtown Lynchburg, VA, is presenting the hilarious, side-splitting musical comedy spoof of Gone With the Wind, entitled “I’ll Never Be Hungry Again.”  

Named after Scarlett O’Hara’s famous declaration and line in the movie this play follows David, a black graduate student, who discovers Gone With the Wind is required reading for his Southern lit class at the University of Michigan.  As many students do, David puts off reading the book until the night before a test only to realize the book has more than 1,000 pages!  He attempts to speed read the book, but falls asleep where he finds himself on the plantation home of Starlett–not Scarlett–O’Hara, trapped as a character int he book he has come to despise.

The small black box atmosphere at Renaissance Theatre is the perfect backdrop for this musical.  An extremely fast-paced production plus over-the-top costumes and exaggerated sound effects keeps the actors and audience enthralled and involved in the story line.  Mike and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

This play will be performed on February 26, 27  and 28 plus March 3, 4 and 5, 2016 at Renaissance Theatre.  Located at 1022 Commerce Street parking can usually be found on the street or in the parking lot just across from the theatre.  Tickets can be purchased at etix.com or by calling 434.845.4427.  But don’t delay, previous shows were all sellouts!

Staying with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast while to enjoy this delightful, yet thought provoking play, we will serve you a southern-style breakfast of Shrimp and Grits if you’d like.  Just request this special breakfast entree’ when calling 434.846.1388 to book your reservation.     

 

Old City Cemetery’s Station House Museum

Posted on
Old City Cemetery

Train Station at Old City Cemetery

This month we are continuing our series of things to see and do in the Old City Cemetery, Lynchburg, VA.

The Station House Museum is the Stapleton Station.  Stapleton Station was the C&O Station at Stapleton, Amherst County, Virginia, from 1898 until 1937.  It was located at mile post 130.8, near Galt’s Mill, fifteen miles east of Lynchburg.  It is the only remaining C&O “Standard Station” of its size and style.  Between 1999-2001 the badly deteriorated station was dismantled board by board and reconstructed in the Old City Cemetery to interpret the importance of railroads in the history of Lynchburg.

The Station is divided into three sections: the Passenger Room, the Station Agent Office and the Baggage Room.  The interior furnishings and instruments reflect the World War I era.

The Passenger Room.  The small, rural C&O Station didn’t offer much comfort to travelers waiting for their train.  It contained a bench, water cooler and signboard showing arrival and departure times.  It served as the community center for the people living near Stapleton, where they shared local and family news, conversation and fellowship.  During WW I the station was the only means of contact between the families and their boys fighting in Europe.  As trains carried the boys off to war it brought most of them home.

The Station Agent Office.  The Station Agent, or Tickemaster, operated the station.  The station’s bay window faced the railroad tracks, enabling the station agent to watch for trains coming from or going to Lynchburg.  On the desk sits a teletype on a three-armed resonator, along with a scissors-style telephone.  This station agent also represented Western Union Telegram Service and Adams Express baggage service from this office.

The Baggage Room.  The freight and baggage room received and shipped the necessities of life and death for the residents of Stapleton, VA.  Baggage, livestock, household and farm purchases were dispensed through this room.  The Railway Postal Clerk, who handled mail and postal baggage while the train was in route, worked from this room.

By 1860 three major railroad lines terminated in Lynchburg, VA: Virginia & Tennessee Railroad (1852), Southside Railroad (1854), and Orange & Alexandria Railroad (1860).  The three railways helped to make Lynchburg a regional hub of industry and tobacco commerce, and one of the wealthiest cities per capita in the United States.  During the Civil War, they made Lynchburg the second largest hospital center in Virginia.

Old City Cemetery is open daily between dawn and dusk.  It is located at 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg, VA.  434.847.1465 for more information.  All museums, buildings and exhibits are accessed through large picture windows and audio taped descriptions of the museums or buildings.  Varoius tours and special events take place in the Cemetery each year.  A calendar of events can be found at www.gravegarden.org.

http://www.lightheavyindustries.com/HOLD/CD_NOV/cdmovie.html

“To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade”

Posted on
Virginia and the American Slave Trade

The American Slave Trade

The Lynchburg Museum is currently showcasing a traveling exhibition from the Library of Virginia entitled “To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade.”

The centerpiece of the exhibit is a painting by Eyre Crowe, a British artist, called “Slaves Waiting for Sale, Richmond, Virginia,” painted in 1861, it depicts the moments just before a slave auction is held in Richmond in 1861.  Crowe’s three paintings (reproduced on panels for the traveling exhibit) show different aspects of the domestic slave trade that began in the early 1800’s.  “After the Sale: Slaves Going South” (1865) documents what came next for the slaves.

The first African slaves came to Virginia in 1619, when the tobacco industry was booming.  By the 1800’s Virginia wasn’t growing as much tobacco leaving more slaves than work.  Some slave owners began selling their slaves (about 600,000–the largest forced migration in U.S. history) to those in the Deep South (“sold South”) where the slaves would help meet the demand for cotton labor.  Richmond became a “slave-collecting and re-sale center,” the largest slave-trading center in the Upper South.  It is estimated that in 1857 the slave trade in Richmond was $4 million dollars (more than $440 million today.)  The slaves sold were transported by ship, rail or overland in groups that often numbered over 300 people.  The end of the journey was often New Orleans, the largest slave-trading city in the U.S.

In addition to the panels the exhibit showcases slave history items from the Lynchburg Museum collection–the deeds of manumission from John Lynch giving his slaves their freedom in 1782, items found during archaeological digs where the homes of Thomas Jefferson’s slaves at Poplar Forest were located, and a letter from a slave to Elijah Fletcher, father of Indiana Fletcher who founded Sweet Briar College.

You can view this exhibit at the Lynchburg Museum, 901 Court Street, until March 6, 2016.  The Museum is open Monday through Saturday between 10 until 4 and Sunday between noon until 4.  Admission to the Museum is free.

An African American genealogy workshop and lecture will be held at the Community Room of the Lynchburg Public Library on February 19 at 2 pm.  This workshop and lecture are being sponsored by the Legacy Museum of African American History.

The Lynchburg Museum is a short distance (walking distance) to The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast.  

 

Red Velvet Waffles with Cream Cheese Icing Drizzle

Posted on
Red Velvet Waffles

Red Velvet Waffles

A new recipe for guests of The Carriage House Inn Bed & Breakfast during the month of February.

As most of you know we feature a signature dish each month, usually based on the season of year, freshest local ingredients available or a holiday celebrated during the month.  In year’s past we have served a chocolate waffle during February.  We have tried different chocolate waffles but the signature dish has been chocolate waffles .  In 2016 we are featuring Red Velvet Waffles!  Maybe it’s time for you to try something new for your sweetie too.  Unlike all of our other recipes this one is super easy because it comes from a box.  We wanted to do something that was quick and easy because who wants to spend their time in the kitchen when you can be with that special person in your life.

Ingredients for the waffles:

  • 1 box red velvet cake mix
  • nonstick cooking spray

For the cream cheese drizzle:

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup milk, warmed

For the red berry salad:

  • 2 cups strawberries, sliced
  • 1 cup raspberries, 1/2 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Preparation for the waffles:

  • Preheat a Belgium waffle iron to medium-high heat.
  • Prepare the cake mix, according to the package directions.  Once the waffle iron is hot, spray with cooking spray.  Pour about 1 cup of the cake batter into the waffle iron.  Cook for 5 minutes, then carefully remove from the waffle iron.  Place is a 250° oven, on the rack only, to keep warm.  Continue making waffles until the batter is gone.

For the cream cheese drizzle:

  • Put the softened cream cheese, sugar, vanilla and salt into a bowl.  Slowly whisk in the milk until smooth.  Set aside.

For the berry salad:

  • Mix together all the ingredients for the red berry salad in a bowl.  Set aside.

When ready to serve top each waffle with a heaping spoonful of the red berry salad and drizzle the cream cheese icing over top.  Happy Valentine’s Day!

**Helpful hint:  we put the cream cheese icing into a squirt bottle so that drizzling was easy.

We are offering a variety of special lodging packages during the month of February.  Come visit Lynchburg, Virginia and stay with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed & Breakfast, select a special Valentine’s Day package and you’ll impress your loved one.  Remember, every day is Valentine’s Day, during the month of February at The Carriage House Inn.  Special packages are offered throughout the month.  Call us with any questions, 434.846.1388.

Waterstone Fire Roasted Pizza

Posted on
Waterstone Pizza

Waterstone Pizza in downtown Lynchburg

Tucked away, below Shoemaker’s American Grille, you will find Waterstone Fire Roasted Pizza Restaurant.

Waterstone Pizza

Bar at Waterstone Pizza

This casual restaurant offers a complete menu.  Start with appetizers or a salad, pastas, sandwiches or pizza for an entree, finish with a variety of desserts plus a selection of hand-crafted beers, brewed in-house.  The pizza is what they are known for: hand-tossed, fire roasted crust topped with fresh, gourmet ingredients and homemade sauces create unrivaled flavors that cannot be duplicated elsewhere.

The menu offers a unique and diverse selection of dishes to try.  Appetizers include Fried Calamari and Arancini.  Salads include Strawberry-Goat Cheese, Fried Green Tomato and Mozarella Stack or Crunchy Chinese.  Prefer a sandwich?  Choose their Fresh Mozarella & Tomato BLT or the Ultimate Italian.  For dinner you might try Wild Mushroom Ravioli or Angel Hair Pasta Pomodoro.  And then there’s the pizza!  The Garden, the Federal Hill, Spicy Thai, the Scillian, the Greek or Build Your Own.  Too many choices!

Waterstone Pizza

Pizza Oven at Waterstone

To complement the delicious food down you might choose a bottled or draught beer, a handcrafted draught beer, a specialty cocktail or martini, wine or non-alcoholic beverage.

When choosing to eat here plan to arrive early or expect a wait.  Reservations are not taken and certainly on weekends there will be a wait.  Doesn’t that tell you all you need to know?  Try the outdoor patio on a warm spring or fall evening.  Waterstone Pizza is located at 1309 Jefferson Street.  434.455.1515.  They are open Monday-Thursday 11-10, Friday & Saturday 11-11 and Sunday 11-10.

Guests staying with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast often walk to Waterstone Pizza.  The James River Heritage Trail can be accessed at the foot of Cabell Street.  From there it’s an easy walk to the end of Jefferson Street and Waterstone Pizza.

To view their menu and to see other great photos check out their website.  This is a great place for friends and family to gather and enjoy great food.

Lynchburg Museum Quilt Exhibit

Posted on

The Lynchburg Museum currently has an exhibit displaying 20 quilts made between 1802 and 2010.

Quilting in America started as a necessity.  Quilts were used as bed coverings or hung over doors or windows to keep the cold out.  Early quilts were usually either plain or whole quilts (three pieces of solid materials quilted together like a sandwich) or patchwork quilts (using various scraps of fabric).  Applique quilts became popular in the mid-1800’s as the availability of more materials allowed “show” quilts to be sewn, not just “utility” quilts. Quilt making became an expression of artistry and skill.  Grandmothers and mothers made applique quilts for their children or grand children.  These were often passed down from one generation to the next.

Quilting bees were an important social activity, as women and girls came together to work on a collective quilt or an individual one.  While quilting they shared stories of their lives and taught essential skills to the girls.

The quilts on display are a combination of historic and modern pieces.  The 1869 crib quilt is of particular note.

The Lynchburg Museum is located at 901 Court Street.  It is open Monday-Saturday 10-4 and Sunday 12-4.  Their phone number is 434.455.6226.  The museum is free to all visitors.

The 1855 Greek revival Court House is one of Lynchburg, Virginia’s most recognizable buildings.  It features a prominent temple façade supported by four massive Doric columns.  The building remained in continuous use as a court house between May 1865 until December 1974.  It opened as the Lynchburg Museum in 1977.

The guest rooms in the mansion, at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, are all covered with quilts.  Kathy’s mother made the quilts we use today.  When you are staying with us be sure to ask to see all of the quilts, we are very proud of them.