Check Availability | 434-846-1388

Historic Lynchburg

W.D. Adams House-210 Cabell Street

Posted on
210 Cabell Street Home

W.D. Adams House is located at 210 Cabell Street

As part of our series on historic homes in Daniels Hill, this month we are featuring the home located at 210 Cabell Street which was built for William Duval Adams in 1875.  He lived there until his death in 1906.  His wife, Victorine, occupied the home until 1917, when she moved to Princeton Circle which was in the more fashionable Rivermont area.  R.C Burkholder (who also designed 404 Cabell Street, The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, and 203 Cabell Street, Burkholder’s personal residence) was the architect.  W.D. Adams and his brothers were Lynchburg business men and industrialists with interests in lumber (Adams Brothers & Payne Lumber Yard) and building supplies (Chilhowie brick).

Ostensibly an Italian villa, with its requisite intersecting rectangles, a tower and a veranda, it owes allegiance to many other styles as well.  Capping the tower is a modified mansard, whose two roof slopes are interrupted at their junction by a prominent cornice, while the decoration of the overhanging main gable of the façade is Stick-style.  This home is situated on a double lot complete with a barn-like building.,  This out building, which probably predates the house, and based upon its location on an original alley from Point of Honor, may have been part of the original Cabell estate.  An etched glass “WDA’ monogramed window can be found in the front door.

The interior of the house contains some of the original wide beam heart pine floors, tall windows and original millwork.  It has six fireplaces, some with their 19th century surrounds. and mantles.  The sunroom, adjoining the front parlor, is a great spot for reading or completing handiwork, such as embroidery.  You can imagine Victorine spending time in this room due to the great light found there.

If you love the charm and character of older homes, then Lynchburg is definitely a place you want to visit.  In addition to the Historic Daniels Hill neighborhood there are 6 other historic districts.  To make your reservation to visit Lynchburg call The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast at 434-846-1388 or book on-line.

The Horner House-315 Cabell Street

Posted on
The Horner House--317 Cabell Street

315 Cabell Street-The Horner House

This post is another in a series of post about the historic homes on Cabell Street.  This post is about the Hroner House built at 315 Cabell Street.   This Greek Revival house was built on a 2-acre lot in 1848 by James E. Horner and his wife Anne Eliza.  The home was constructed using a two-story, two room plan with a center hallway along with an English basement, two chimneys and two porches, one on each floor.  The chimney on the right side of the home was removed during the restoration that took place around 2005.  The house had a 2,000 square foot addition, to the rear of the structure, added by it’s second owner, Isaac Adams.  While constructing the addition Adams enhanced the front entry hall by laying down decorative inlaid oak flooring.  He also added wood detailing around the windows and corner key door frames.  All seven fireplaces had ornate mantels added.  He expanded the width of the front porch to the full length of the house.

According to popular legend the Queen Anne style house, located today at 317 Cabell Street (to the left of The Horner House, was built for the Adams daughter when she married. The original lot was later subdivided giving the property at 317 Cabell Street it’s own legal address. Originally the electric and plumbing systems ran from 315 into 317.

From the back porch of this house is one of the most captivating views of downtown Lynchburg.

Many of our guests visit Lynchburg to view or study the architecture of the 17th Century.  The city is rich with architectural jewels in its 7 historic districts.  .

 

The Dawson House-301 Cabell Street

Posted on
301 Cabell Street

The Dawson House at 301 Cabell Street

This frame house was built in 1873 by Renny and Mary Dawson.  It was one of the first houses constructed during the building boom on Daniel’s Hill following its annexation to the city in 1870.  Mr. Dawson owned a tobacco box factory located nearby in the Upper basin (present-day site of Griffin Pipe).

The house is typical of the Victorian era but displays a number of architectural refinements that point to a knowledgeable architect or builder.  Although the Cabell Street front is only two bays wide, the façade is divided into two equal planes that stand at right angles to each other.  Both bays are covered by gables adorned with vergeboards with carved trim.

The tiny front porch occupied the space formed by the re-entrant of the façade.  Embellished with octagonal columns and pilasters the porch is polygonal in plan.  The unusually located front door-almost hidden from Cabell Street-comes into view as you approach the front porch.  This door and all of the windows are topped by shallow rectangular pediments.

Among the noteworthy architectural features of the interior are the original curved wooden handrail of the staircase and the fireplace mantels found in each room.

The Daniels Hill neighborhood is on the National Historic Register and the neighborhood has many homes of historic significance.  The neighborhood was established when the plantation, once owned by Dr. George Cabell, was carved up into lots and sold to individuals as the City of Lynchburg was growing.

 

Christ Episcopal Church-215 Cabell Street

Posted on
Christ Episcopal Church, Lynchburg Virginia

Interior of Christ Episcopal Church today

This post is a continuation of posts about the homes/businesses that were built in Daniels Hill during the 1800’s and early 1900’s.  Christ Episcopal Church was built in 1870 as one of four satellite chapels to serve Grace Memorial Episcopal Church.  Built in a simple Gothic style, the arched windows of the former nave and chancel are still visible.  The building has a stepped gable roof of standing seam metal and brick siding (5-course American bond) with a brick and stone foundation.  According to insurance maps a two-story brick tower stood on the front of the building and a small one-story wing was on the rear, neither of which are present today.

By 1898 its use as a church was abandoned and it was no longer used as a place of worship.  In 1900, the property came into possession of William H. Baldcock, a grocer; and the firm of Baldcock & Thornhill, Grocers occupied the building.  In 1902 a two-story storefront, that is on the building today, was constructed.

In 1913 Baldcock sold the property to Macie White, wife of grocer James White.  The structure continued to serve as a grocery store until sometime between 1920 and 1925 when it became the Cabell Street mission for the Salvation Army.

In 1950 the Standard Notion Company began using the structure as a warehouse.  In 1954 Macie White left the property to her daughter, Estelle White McDaniel.

Christ Episcopal Church

View of Christ Episcopal Church interior from balcony.

The McDaniels continued to operate the Standard Notion Company through 1960.  Then, after years of neglect the current owner’s purchased the building.  They contemplated converting it to a residence but later decided to finish the space into an event venue for smallish (50-70) events such as weddings, showers, corporate events, etc.  The brick balcony on the front of the building and iron staircase were added by the current owners.  They installed new hardwood flooring and cleaned up the walls leaving the exposed brick and the remains of some of the old plaster. Work on the project has stalled but the hopes are that it will soon be operational and that once again people will be able to use and enjoy what was once Christ Episcopal Church.

Christ Episcopal Church is just one block from The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast so if you are in need of a larger event space than we can hanlde let us know and we will see if this venue is available.  Of course we would be happy to address your overnight needs.

 

Bawdy Ladies Tour at Old City Cemetery

Posted on

 

Old City Cemetery

Grave at Old City Cemetery

Every other year the Old City Cemetery, in Lynchburg, VA, conducts it’s Bawdy Ladies of the 19th Century Tour.  This year’s tour will be held on Sunday, September 21, 2014 between 3:00-4:00 PM.

What is a Bawdy Ladies tour?  Historian Nancy Weiland will lead a tour of the cemetery grounds to the graves of some of Lynchburg’s “sporting ladies” of Buzzard’s roost and Fourth Street.  Stories describing the lives and lore of the ladies and their madams will highlight life in Lynchburg’s more savory neighborhoods and houses.  This is not a ghost walk, but rather a tour of the cemetery from a different perspective, describing some of it’s more colorful “inhabitants”.

Buzzard’s Roost is the area between Jefferson Street (Lynch street back then) and Commerce Street in the downtown section of Lynchburg.  This area once full of bars bordellos and gambling houses thrived as a hub of commerce, especially during the war when it was said many of these ladies operated as spies as are said to pass secrets.

These “sporting houses” as they were called in Lynchburg were often run by women, both white and free women of color.  As downtown industries expanded in the early 1900’s they pushed these business out of the downtown area to the red light district on Fourth Street in the Tinbridge Hill Neighborhood.

Many of the “sporting ladies” or working girls as we call them today often climbed the social ladder and became prominent citizens as they married politicians, police chiefs, mayors and other prominent citizens.  It is said that they helped bail the City of Lynchburg out of financial difficulties by donating money to a church who then in turn donated it to the City since the City refused to take their money directly.  Likewise a wealthy madam gave a small private college in Roanoke  a large endowment and the college.  During the tour in the Old City Cemetery you will hear stories of how these ladies, some of whom became very wealthy, lived and their contributions to the area.

This walking tour is free of charge, over uneven ground plus up and down hills and begins at the Old City Cemetery Gate House, located at 401 Taylor Street, or about two miles from The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast.  Advance tickets are not required.  For more information contact the cemetery office at 434.847.1465.  We will see you there!

Cabell Street Row Houses

Posted on
Cabell Street Row Houses, Lynchburg, VA

Cabell Street Row Houses, circa 1899

In 1899 the Cabell Street Row Houses were built on Cabell Street.

The 600 block of Cabell Street was originally owned by Judge William Daniel, Jr. and remained in the Daniel family until 1881.  The owners of the property with the longest tenure after the Daniels were Dennis and Annie Morrison, who owned the lot for almost 60 years from 1883 until 1942.  Dennis Morrison was a merchant on Main Street and officer of the Lynchburg Diamond Ice Company.

The Morrison’s built the six row houses but never lived in any of them.  They kept them as rental properties for decades.  Tenants in the early 1900’s were primarily tradesmen and railroad workers.  In 1900 the last house in the row (623) was home to the pastor of the Cabell Street Baptist Church.

This group of six dwelling units is typical of many speculative townhouse developments built in the growing cities after the Civil War.  The urban renewal movement had been the cause for destruction of great quantities of such buildings during the 1950’s and 1960’s.

This group of row houses’ architectural style is Italianate with 7-course American bond brick construction.  The houses have a total of 18 bays, with 6 one-story tall, one-bay-wide porches and have a prominent wood cornice which rises above the roof as a parapet.  Entering through the front door, 13 foot ceilings and large windows throughout the house give the appearance of grandeur of other fine homes in Lynchburg.  The kitchen is located in the back of the house on the ground level.  The dining room is located in the front of the house on the midlevel.  Spacious but economical seems to have been the plan of the developers.

When the Cabell Street Row Houses were redeveloped in the 1980’s restrictive covenants were put into the deeds prohibiting them from being rental properties so the once tenant occupied row houses are now all owner occupied.

This post is one of a series of posts about properties around The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast which are located in the Daniel’s Hill Historic District.