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Historic Lynchburg

The Water Bearer

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Water Bearer

The Water Bearer

A reconstructed Water Bearer statue was unveiled at the official opening of Lower Bluff Walk last week.  Lower Bluff Walk is part of the city’s emphasis of a pedestrian walkway where residents and visitors of Lynchburg can stroll, gather, enjoy food and music and take in the sweeping views of the James River.

The historic, seven-foot tall, approximately 300-400 pounds, zinc statue was put on display at the Lynchburg city reservoir, at the corner of Clay and Seventh Streets in 1883.  The original Water Bearer was purchased from a catalog for $500.00 was the first public art in the city. and was to commemorate the opening of the city reservoir in 1829, after a dam was placed across the James River and a canal leading from the dam to the water wheel-powered pump station that supplied the water to the reservoir was completed.  The female figure, perhaps Egyptian, stood balanced on one foot with a large jug of water on her left shoulder.  By 2012 the Water Bearer lay broken in many pieces.  Stress fractures were found on the ankles after standing more than 130 years.

The statue’s reconstruction and its cost were hurdles the Lynchburg Historic Foundation were willing to tackle in order to bring a part of Lynchburg’s art history back to life.  After successfully raising $40,000 for the restoration project the real work began.

After carefully examining the original zinc water bearer it was decided that it couldn’t be repaired so the Foundation hired an artist to re-create the original statue using the original pieces as molds for the new bronze statue.   The artist from Alexandria, VA, who taught himself to sculpt,decided he would recast it in bronze, calling bronze “a forever metal”.

Working almost exclusively for 24 months, on this project, Ken Faraoni used a technique called “lost- wax casting”.  He created about 30 molds backed with plaster and poured casting wax into them.  Once he cleaned up the wax he took the pieces to Colorado where they were put together and a ceramic shell was created around the wax.  Liquid bronze was poured into the wax.  Once the bronze had cooled the ceramic pieces were hit with a hammer and the bronze recasting was left behind.  After smoothing out the recasting, a painstaking procedure, the final polishing was completed followed by a few coats of lacquer.  The statue was now ready to be displayed.

On a pleasantly warm, sunny day the recreated Water Bearer was unveiled to a large crowd of onlookers, who gasped when the beautifully recasted Water Bearer sculpture was revealed.  The statue is now a landmark of the work that the city of Lynchburg has accomplished in it’s revitalization and guides the way to the future of downtown.  Take the time to walk along Lower Bluff Walk.  Stop in one of the delicious restaurants for a meal or beverage.  Or just sit on a park bench and enjoy the view of Riverfront Park and the James River.

The Water Bearer is a pleasant walk from the Carriage House Inn B & B.  And once at the statue you can wander through downtown or onto Percival’s Island or the Blackwater Creek Trail.

Lynchburg’s Community Market

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Lynchburg Community Market

Fresh picked veggies at Lynchburg Community Market

The Lynchburg Community Market opened in 1783.  The third oldest farmer’s market in the country, it has played a role in the development, growth and revitalization of downtown.

Fresh Veggies

Fresh Veggies

The first Market was located on Water Street (now known as Ninth Street).  It was an open-air market that served as the central gathering place for the city.  In 1814 the Market was rebuilt in the center of Water Street.  It served as the town square for the city, with city-wide notices and speakers throughout the day and evening hours.

In 1872 the Market was enlarged and rebuilt on Main Street between 11th and 12th Streets.  It had enclosed spaces and an auditorium on site.  Today, after many changes in building style and location, the Community Market is located at the corner of Main and 12th Streets–1219 Main Street.

The Lynchburg Community Market offers the best of local produce, arts, baked goods and unique eateries.  Farmers can be found on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Located primarily outside of the market they travel up to 100 miles to sell their produce (fruits or vegetables), pastured meats, eggs, artisan cheeses, and flowers or plants.  Artisan food vendors also visit the Market on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  They are located both outside and inside the Market.  Offering locally produced baked goods, jams & jellies, honey, syrups, grains and oils.  Inside the Market is the cooperative artist space where crafters and Artists sell their handmade creations, some inspired by our region of Virginia.  You may find hand-thrown pottery, jewelry, goats milk soaps, local photography, paintings and art made from natural Virginia stone.  Breakfast and lunch is served at several on-site restaurants.

Lynchburg Community Market

Lynchburg Community Market

Special events take place at the Market throughout the year.  Cooking demonstrations, live music at the market, food truck rodeos, food and wine tastings, conferring with a Master Gardener about plant or yard issues and demonstrations by the Heritage Crafters and Artists.

The Lynchburg Community Market is open Tuesday through Saturday between 7:00 until 2:00, year round.  The Farmer’s Market is open Wednesday between 10:00 until 2:00, with Green Market Wednesdays during the months of May through November.  Saturday the Farmer’s Market is open between 7:00 until 2:00, all year round.  The Heritage Crafters Gallery and Artist Alley are open Tuesday through Friday between 9:00 until 2:00.  On Saturdays they are open between 7:00 until 2:00.  If you have any questions the Market can be reached at 434.455.4485.

When planning our breakfast menus at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast we oftentimes visit the Lynchburg Community Market to purchase local, fresh and in season fruits or vegetables.  Even though we have a significant garden in our backyard, supplementing what we grow with items from local farms, orchards, bakeries and flower vendors helps keep our breakfast items exciting and delicious.  Many of our guests visit the Market and head home with a bag or two of goodies.

 

 

Cabinet Makers Along the James River

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The James River runs through the heart of Virginia’s, and Lynchburg’s, history.  During the 1700’s cabinet makers and furniture makers lived and made their wares along the James River.  Recently, newly rediscovered work of colonial Richmond cabinetmakers George Donald and Thomas Arbuthnot has been studied by curators from the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts.

The Lynchburg Museum is proud to share it’s exhibits on significant James River objects from the 1700’s and 1800’s.  The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts will present a lecture discussing the new research and discoveries contained in their collection in Winston-Salem, NC.  The lecture and tour, of exhibits found in our museum, will take place on Saturday, May 23rd at 3:00 pm at the Lynchburg Museum located at 901 Court Street in downtown Lynchburg, VA.  The exhibit tour and lecture are free for Museum members or $10.00 for non-members.  For further information call 434.455.6226.

Monument Terrace, a rally to support our troops

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Monument Terrace

699th rally at Monument Terrace in support of the troops.

Monument Terrace

699 weeks!

On Friday May 8, 2015 a group of former military men and women along with their families will be holding their weekly rally at the foot of Monument Terrace showing their support for our military.  What is significant about this date is it represents the 700th consecutive Friday that these men and women have been here.  Taking liberty with the Post Office’s motto one could say, Neither snow nor rain nor heat keeps these individuals from showing support to our troops by attending this weekly rally.  Today, May 1st it was a chilly and rainy day when this photo was taken.  Today’s rally was number 699.

Think about it, 700 consecutive weeks, that’s almost 14 years and they have been out there during the dog days of summer as well as the coldest and snowy days of winter.  They have had to brave wind and rain and every conceivable type of weather over these 700 weeks.

The rally at Monument Terrace started at the first Gulf War and no one ever envisioned that it would last this long.  In fact, it was supposed to end at the end of the first Gulf War, but then it was decided that there should never be an end to showing support for our troops so it continues today.

Monument Terrace

Monument Terrace, Lynchburg, VA

I am urging everyone to head downtown to the foot of Monument Terrace (Church Street and 9th Street) this Friday, May 8, 2015 from noon to 1:00pm to show their support for our troops.  If you can’t stay, at least make a point to drive by and honk to show support for our troops.

The group that holds the weekly rally has a Facebook Page that I recommend everyone Like.

The inspiring rise of Monument Terrace commemorates Lynchburg citizens who fought and died in the Civil War, Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam and present day. At the base on Church Street stands the iconic doughboy statue. Many other sculptures and markers line the 139 steps and terraces all the way to the top, where a statue of a Confederate soldier stands.  Across the street at the top of Monument Terrace is the old Court House which is now a museum..

When planning a trip to Lynchburg and your stay at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, plan on visiting Monument Terrace and if you are here on a Friday, make sure you visit between noon and 1:00pm.

 

 

 

 

W.D. Adams House-210 Cabell Street

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210 Cabell Street Home

W.D. Adams House is located at 210 Cabell Street

As part of our series on historic homes in Daniels Hill, this month we are featuring the home located at 210 Cabell Street which was built for William Duval Adams in 1875.  He lived there until his death in 1906.  His wife, Victorine, occupied the home until 1917, when she moved to Princeton Circle which was in the more fashionable Rivermont area.  R.C Burkholder (who also designed 404 Cabell Street, The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, and 203 Cabell Street, Burkholder’s personal residence) was the architect.  W.D. Adams and his brothers were Lynchburg business men and industrialists with interests in lumber (Adams Brothers & Payne Lumber Yard) and building supplies (Chilhowie brick).

Ostensibly an Italian villa, with its requisite intersecting rectangles, a tower and a veranda, it owes allegiance to many other styles as well.  Capping the tower is a modified mansard, whose two roof slopes are interrupted at their junction by a prominent cornice, while the decoration of the overhanging main gable of the façade is Stick-style.  This home is situated on a double lot complete with a barn-like building.,  This out building, which probably predates the house, and based upon its location on an original alley from Point of Honor, may have been part of the original Cabell estate.  An etched glass “WDA’ monogramed window can be found in the front door.

The interior of the house contains some of the original wide beam heart pine floors, tall windows and original millwork.  It has six fireplaces, some with their 19th century surrounds. and mantles.  The sunroom, adjoining the front parlor, is a great spot for reading or completing handiwork, such as embroidery.  You can imagine Victorine spending time in this room due to the great light found there.

If you love the charm and character of older homes, then Lynchburg is definitely a place you want to visit.  In addition to the Historic Daniels Hill neighborhood there are 6 other historic districts.  To make your reservation to visit Lynchburg call The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast at 434-846-1388 or book on-line.

The Horner House-315 Cabell Street

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The Horner House--317 Cabell Street

315 Cabell Street-The Horner House

This post is another in a series of post about the historic homes on Cabell Street.  This post is about the Hroner House built at 315 Cabell Street.   This Greek Revival house was built on a 2-acre lot in 1848 by James E. Horner and his wife Anne Eliza.  The home was constructed using a two-story, two room plan with a center hallway along with an English basement, two chimneys and two porches, one on each floor.  The chimney on the right side of the home was removed during the restoration that took place around 2005.  The house had a 2,000 square foot addition, to the rear of the structure, added by it’s second owner, Isaac Adams.  While constructing the addition Adams enhanced the front entry hall by laying down decorative inlaid oak flooring.  He also added wood detailing around the windows and corner key door frames.  All seven fireplaces had ornate mantels added.  He expanded the width of the front porch to the full length of the house.

According to popular legend the Queen Anne style house, located today at 317 Cabell Street (to the left of The Horner House, was built for the Adams daughter when she married. The original lot was later subdivided giving the property at 317 Cabell Street it’s own legal address. Originally the electric and plumbing systems ran from 315 into 317.

From the back porch of this house is one of the most captivating views of downtown Lynchburg.

Many of our guests visit Lynchburg to view or study the architecture of the 17th Century.  The city is rich with architectural jewels in its 7 historic districts.  .