Check Availability | 434-846-1388

Historic Lynchburg

Antique Rose Festival

Posted on
Antique Rose

Mme Isaac Perriere Introduced: 1881 Class: Bourbon

Old City Cemetery, in Lynchburg, VA, is hosting the 21st Annual Antique Rose Festival on Saturday and Sunday, May 7 & 8, 2016.

The Antique Rose collection was planted in 1986 on both sides of the 800 foot remains of the 1860’s old brick wall.  The 60 varieties planted here are representative of rose history from before 1581 thrrought the 19th century.  The roses chosen include the full range of classes and colors exhibited by these ancestors of modern day roses.  The original plants were gathered from across the United States and Canada, including local gardens.

Antique Rose

Jessica’s Rose early 20th century

The “mother roses” have been grown locally.  They are cut and rooted by local volunteers, who take care of them throughout the year.  These cuttings, showcasing about 120 varieties of roses this year, will be for sale on both May 7 & 8.  Prices will be dependent upon the size of the rose plant.  Old City Cemetery is also selling some perennial off-shoots this year.  Some of the perennials will be clematis, snowball, deutzia and rosemary plants.

The roses and perennials will be sold starting on Friday, May 6th at 5:00 pm.  The sales continue until Sunday, May 8th at 5:00 pm.

On Sunday, May 8th at 3:00 the Mother’s Day Rose Walk will take place.  This walking tour of the roses growing along the brick wall will describe and explain the history of these roses.  Some will be in bloom, while others will be in bud.  The walking tour should delight your senses!

For more information you can contact Old City Cemetery at 434.847.1465 or visit www.gravegarden.org.

The pictures of the roses, found in this blog post, were taken by Mike Bedsworth during last year’s rose festival.

Historic Garden Week 2016

Posted on
Garden Week

Flowers at The Carriage House Inn by Mike Bedsworth

The Garden Club of Virginia is proud to welcome you to Historic Garden Week, April 23-30, 2016. This year 30 tours have been organized and hosted by 47 Garden Club of Virginia member clubs.  Nearly 250 private homes, gardens and historic sites will be open throughout the state.  You might tour just the homes and gardens in your town, a nearby town or you might travel across the state touring various areas and locales to explore more of Virginia.

Garden Day

Flowers at The Carriage House Inn by Michael Bedsworth

Garden Day in Lynchburg, VA., hosted by the Lynchburg Garden Club and Hillside Garden Club, will be held on Tuesday, April 26 between 10 until 6.  This year’s tour, a walking tour, will highlight five private homes located on or just off of Peakland Place, in the Boonsboro section of Lynchburg. The houses, all built in the 1920’s and 1930’s and their gardens vary in size and formality.  Some of the homes have had extensive renovations or restoration work done.  Others are virtually unchanged from their original grandeur.  The gardens are also varied, some have had years of history while others are in their infancy.

Garden Week

Flowers at The Carriage House Inn by Michael Bedsworth

In addition to touring the homes and gardens five special activities, lectures and demonstrations will be taking place along Peakland Place.  Between 10 until 2 a lecture on the variety and care of hybrid boxwoods will take place at 3908 Peakland Place.  At 11 and again at noon a lecture on growing grapes will be held at 3890 Peakland Place.  Growing, harvesting and using lavender will be discussed at 3850 Peakland Place at 1 and again at 2.  3840 Peakland Place will host two lectures about raising bees, at 3 and at 4.  Between 11 until 4 Blenheim Vineyard will host a wine tasting at Oakwood Country Club.

Garden Day

Flowers at The Carriage House Inn by Michael Bedsworth

Local food trucks will be parked along Peakland Place to serve you sweets or savories throughout the day.

In addition to the homes and gardens along Peakland Place various historic sites will be open to those who have purchased a Garden Day tour ticket.  These include Anne Spencer House and Garden, Miller-Claytor House and Garden, Old City Cemetery, Point of Honor, Sweet Briar House and Garden and Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest.

Tour tickets can be purchased at various locations throughout Lynchburg prior to the 26th or at Oakwood Country Club on the day of the tour.  Full tour tickets are $30, single site tickets are $10 and tickets purchased in advance are $25.

The photos were taken here, at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast over the past couple of years.  Enjoy!

Plein Air Painting (Paint Out)

Posted on
Old City Cemetery

Dayspring at Old City Cemetery by Annette Kinsey

The Lynchburg Art Club is hosting their first annual “Paint Out Lynchburg” starting on Friday, April 29 and ending Sunday, May 1, 2016.

What is a “Paint Out?”  This “open air” painting festival is reminiscent of late 19th century French Impressionist painters, such as Monet and Manet, combining their love of nature and creativity when painting out of doors.

Downtown Lynchburg and its historic districts are known for its architecture, gardens, the James River and more.  You set up your easel and paints and become inspired by our unique city.  Using acrylic, oil, pastels or watercolors you will be able to paint at Old City Cemetery, in downtown Lynchburg and at Point of Honor.

Paint Out

Lynchburg College Chapel by Ranny Aultice

Old City Cemetery has 27 acres in which you can set up on Friday, April 29th.  Ancient trees, antique roses (which should be blooming!), various gardens, a fish pond and five historic museums provide many painting options.

Downtown Lynchburg will host the painters on Saturday, April 30th.  Paint the Academy Theatre, The Allied Arts Building, The Krise Building, any of the tobacco warehouses that now are loft apartments or even the Texas Inn.

On Sunday, May 1st Point of Honor will offer the painters panoramic views of downtown and the James River or the historic mansion and cooking kitchen,

In addition to you painting there will be demonstrations, a quick paint competition and a juried art show that will showcase the paintings at the Academy of Fine Arts between May 6th and May 22, 2016,  More than $1500 in cash prizes will be awarded.

Registration is now open.  You may select a 3 day package or an individual day of painting.  A three day painting package is $40.  Day painting fees are as follows: Friday $15, Saturday $15 and Sunday $10.  Checks should be made out to the Lynchburg Art Club, 1011 Rivermont Avenue, Lynchburg, VA 24504.  For more information contact the Lynchburg Art Club at 434.528.9434.

The above images in this blog are by members of the Lynchburg Art Club, but you don’t have to be a member to participate in the Paint Out.

Stay with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, 2-night minimum, and we will provide you with a boxed lunch on Saturday.  Call us at 434.846.1388 to select your room and make your reservation.  Or come stay with us during the gallery exhibit and enjoy all of the paintings completed during this three day event.

 

The J 611 Rides Again!

Posted on
611 steam Train

Ride the 611 Photo by Casey Thomason, Norfolk Southern Corporation

The Virginia Museum of Transportation is pleased to announce that the Norfolk & Western J 611 steam passenger locomotive will have another run.

The powerful and sleek Class J passenger locomotives were designed and built in Roanoke, VA in 1950 by the Norfolk & Western Railway.  They were known as the finest steam passenger locomotives in the world.

The first trip in 2016 will be hosted by the North Carolina Transportation Museum.  Using the Norfolk Southern rails it will run on Saturday, April 9 from Spencer, NC to Lynchburg, VA and return, on The Virginian.

On May 7 and 8 the 611, The Powhatan Arrow, will return to Roanoke to run half-day excursions from Roanoke to Lynchburg and back, following the Blue Ridge grade.

Seating options on all of the excursions include coach, first class and dome cars.  A dining car and observation car will also be available.

Last year, June 14, 2015, we traveled on the 611 between Lynchburg and Petersburg (see blog post dated June 1, 2015.)  The train ride was something to experience along with the scenery between the two stops.  Last year all seats sold out in record time, so if you’re interested in this unique train trip make your reservation early.

For more information contact the Virginia Museum of Transportation at 540.342.5670 or click here for the schedule and costs.  It’s a mode of travel like none other.

Old City Cemetery’s Hearse House and Caretaker’s Museum

Posted on
Hearse

When you could afford the best, this hearse was used.

Following in our series of things to see and do at Lynchbrug, Virginia’s Old City Cemetery, this month we are featuring it’s Hearse House and Caretaker’s Museum.

Old City Cemetery

The old wagon doubled as a hearse for many being buried at Old City Cemetery

The Hearse House and Caretakers Museum depicts the history of the burial and grave marking customs practiced in Lynchburg between 1866 until 1954.  It also shows the story of the cemetery’s maintenance, or lack thereof, during it’s 210 year long existence.

Old City Cemetery's Hearse House and Caretaker's Museum

Old City Cemetery’s Hearse House and Caretaker’s Museum

Included in this museum is an original, turn-of-the-century hearse from the Diuguid Funeral Home. Diuguid has been in business in Lynchburg since 1817, and is considered Lynchburg’s oldest “institution.”.  They are the second oldest funeral home in Virginia.  This hearse would have been used to carry a casket to one of the private cemeteries in Lynchburg.  Pulled by a team of horses, white horses pulled the hearse for children and black horses for adults.

Old City Cemetery

Working on old grave markers in the Hearse House and Caretaker’s Museum

A horse-drawn wagon, made by Thornhill Wagonworks, is also found here.  It too was used as a hearse, along with being used by the cemetery’s groundskeepers to haul their equipment and workers.

When the cemetery opened in 1806 families took care of their own grave sites or plots.  The cemetery hired it’s first official caretaker in 1866.  He was paid $100 per year and was only responsible for the care of the Confederate Section.  Originally, and until about 1954, the caretakers lived “on-sire” or on Taylor or Wise Streets.  As time passed their duties were expanded to include: digging graves and the maintenance of the entire cemetery.  As some of you know, the cemetery became over-grown and in much disrepair until about 1981 when the future of the cemetery was passed onto four women who renamed the association tending to the cemetery the Southern Memorial Association.  They began the arduous task of clearing dead trees, brush and overgrown weeds and plants to discover unique gravestones, walls, paths and more.  What you see today is testament to their hard work, that continues today, for over 20 years.

Old City Cemetery

Tools on display in the Hearse House and Caretaker’s Museum

Take the time to linger at this museum and imagine life in Lynchburg in the mid- to late-1800’s.  Next month we will feature the Mourning Museum, to tie into the history of burial and their customs.

The Old City Cemetery is located at 401 Taylor Street.  The grounds are open daily from dawn to dusk.  The Cemetery Center is open Monday through Saturday between 10 until 3 and Sundays between 1 until 5, April through December.

Looking for a place to stay while in Lynchburg?  The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast is close to all the local attractions.  Book your stay with us on-line or by calling 434-846-1388.

 

Old City Cemetery’s Station House Museum

Posted on
Old City Cemetery

Train Station at Old City Cemetery

This month we are continuing our series of things to see and do in the Old City Cemetery, Lynchburg, VA.

The Station House Museum is the Stapleton Station.  Stapleton Station was the C&O Station at Stapleton, Amherst County, Virginia, from 1898 until 1937.  It was located at mile post 130.8, near Galt’s Mill, fifteen miles east of Lynchburg.  It is the only remaining C&O “Standard Station” of its size and style.  Between 1999-2001 the badly deteriorated station was dismantled board by board and reconstructed in the Old City Cemetery to interpret the importance of railroads in the history of Lynchburg.

The Station is divided into three sections: the Passenger Room, the Station Agent Office and the Baggage Room.  The interior furnishings and instruments reflect the World War I era.

The Passenger Room.  The small, rural C&O Station didn’t offer much comfort to travelers waiting for their train.  It contained a bench, water cooler and signboard showing arrival and departure times.  It served as the community center for the people living near Stapleton, where they shared local and family news, conversation and fellowship.  During WW I the station was the only means of contact between the families and their boys fighting in Europe.  As trains carried the boys off to war it brought most of them home.

The Station Agent Office.  The Station Agent, or Tickemaster, operated the station.  The station’s bay window faced the railroad tracks, enabling the station agent to watch for trains coming from or going to Lynchburg.  On the desk sits a teletype on a three-armed resonator, along with a scissors-style telephone.  This station agent also represented Western Union Telegram Service and Adams Express baggage service from this office.

The Baggage Room.  The freight and baggage room received and shipped the necessities of life and death for the residents of Stapleton, VA.  Baggage, livestock, household and farm purchases were dispensed through this room.  The Railway Postal Clerk, who handled mail and postal baggage while the train was in route, worked from this room.

By 1860 three major railroad lines terminated in Lynchburg, VA: Virginia & Tennessee Railroad (1852), Southside Railroad (1854), and Orange & Alexandria Railroad (1860).  The three railways helped to make Lynchburg a regional hub of industry and tobacco commerce, and one of the wealthiest cities per capita in the United States.  During the Civil War, they made Lynchburg the second largest hospital center in Virginia.

Old City Cemetery is open daily between dawn and dusk.  It is located at 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg, VA.  434.847.1465 for more information.  All museums, buildings and exhibits are accessed through large picture windows and audio taped descriptions of the museums or buildings.  Varoius tours and special events take place in the Cemetery each year.  A calendar of events can be found at www.gravegarden.org.