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Things to do

Antique Roses in Lynchburg

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Mme Isaac Perriere Introduced: 1881 Class:  Bourbon

Mme Isaac Perriere
Introduced: 1881
Class: Bourbon

Fortuniana Introduced 1850

Fortuniana
Introduced 1850

Antique Roses in Lynchburg are in bloom in the Old City Cemetery!  Each year Old City Cemetery gives the public the opportunity to purchase antique roses that are grown on the grounds.  This is a great opportunity for you to add to your collection.  If you don’t have a yard but enjoy roses, April and May is the perfect time wander the grounds and enjoy the roses that are in bloom.  The antique rose collection was planted in 1986 along the 500 foot remains of the 1860’s old brick wall.  The 60 varieties were chosen to represent the history of the rose from the mid 1500’s through the 19th century.  These roses came from around the country as well as Canada and include plants that were donated by local gardeners. Additionally there are numerous other varieties of antique roses throughout the rest of the 26 acre cemetery.  All are botanically labeled at the site. If you are visiting Lynchburg or you live here, take time out of your schedule to stop and smell the roses.

 

Jessica's Rose early 20th century

Jessica’s Rose
early 20th century

The Old City Cemetery is located at 401 Taylor Street and is just 5 minutes away from The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast.  They are open daily and can be reached by calling 434-847-1465.  This year, the cemetery is holding its 13th annual Antique Rose Festival May 17th from 9:00am to 2:00pm.  Cemetery “rosarians”–rose experts will lead guided tours at 10:00am and noon.  In addition there will be planting demonstrations and tips on how to care for rose beds throughout the day.

Please note that there is some degree of speculation as to the true identity of  certain antique roses and the Cemetery welcomes expert opinions and enjoys the rediscovery of the mystery of these garden treasures.

The grounds of The Old City Cemetery has over a thousand plants, trees, flowers that are marked.  There is something blooming in the Spring, Summer and Fall, not to mention the great fall colors, especially in the Confederate burial section.  No wonder this is Lynchburg’s most visited site.

Starting next month every Saturday morning throughout the summer there is a free walking tour of the cemetery.  Wear comfortable shoes as the tour includes walking over uneven ground.  One of the cemetery employees will lead the tour.

“Canstruction” Project in Downtown Lynchburg, VA

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Train made from donated cans

Train made from donated cans

Using donated cans of food, the Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce Leadership Lynchburg team, downtown venues and businesses, scout troops and concerned citizens will provide hunger relief in our community through an event called “Canstruction”

On Saturday, April 13th 6-8 teams gathered to compete in creating unique artwork structures using canned food.  Each team was mentored by an engineer, architect or contractor.  The completed structures can be seen and admired in the following locations through Saturday April 20th: Amazement Square, Bank of the James, main lobby in the main street branch, City Hall, the Galleria, Holiday Inn Select and the downtown YMCA.

Canstruction Lynchburg is designed to benefit the area by providing an established competition to generate needed canned food supplies for the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank. All donated cans used in the canstruction projects and other canned goods donated by individuals from the community at the canstruction sites will fill a constantly increasing need in the Lynchburg area.  The canstruction teams were also educated on the issue of hunger in our area to further help eliminate hunger in the future.

Be sure and visit the display sites this week, some of them are truly amazing.

The Tasting Room is Open!

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Lovingston Winery

Lovingston Winery’s Tasting Room is open.

 

Lovingston Winery is celebrating the beginning of spring (even though the weather is not co-operating!) and their new releases with their opening of the tasting room.  Saturday, April 6th starting at 11 am until 5:00 pm the tasting room will be open for the season.  Visit to taste their newly bottled Seyal-Blanc ’12, their Petit Manseng ’12 and their award-winning Estate Reserve 2009.  Tastings are free and if you stay with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast you can make arrangements for a picnic lunch.

Lovingston Winery is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, about 30 minutes from Lynchburg.  Over 8 acres of densely planted (1200 vines per acre) vines produce delicious Merlot, Pinotage, Rose and the wines that are recent award winners.  The winery is built into the hillside and employs a gravity-flow production method that can be viewed from the tasting room.

Always a delicious and fun visit we have enjoyed Lovingston wines on many occasions.

For directions and more information visit their web site at www.lovingstonwinery.com  And call us at 434.846.1388 to make your reservation at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast for a weekend or weekday visit and wine tasting.

 

 

View from the tasting area.

 

Civil War Re-enactment and Living History

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The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast in Lynchburg, VA is approximately 20 miles from Appomattox Courthouse we wanted to make our blog followers and guests aware of a unique experience taking place just minutes from us in April.

“The Long Road Home – Fall of Richmond” re-enactment and living history weekend will take place April 5, 6 & 7, 2013 in the Clover Hill Village, just east of Appomattox, VA.  Beginning at 9:00 am of Friday and lasting until 2:00 pm Sunday a unique set of events, activities and interactions will be taking place within the living history village.  Visit with troops while they set camp.  View battalion drills, trench work, battles and hospital scenes.  Interact with Generals Lee and Grant, Presidents Lincoln and Davis.  Attend a wedding and barn dance.  Watch the medal presentation and pay call.  Obtain an interesting perspective of life during the Civil War.

Unless you are a re-enactor and will be “camping”  call us, 434.846.1388, to make your reservation and stay in comfort (indoor plumbing, central heat, a hot shower, our delicious 4-course breakfast, comfortable bed)!  We’d love to host you while you experience the way things were.

For more detailed information and to see the full weekend schedule visit www.appomattoxhistoricalsociety.org  Clover Hill Village is located at 5747 River Ridge Road in Appomattox.

 

 

 

Maple Syrup Tapping

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Taping a maple tree

Taping a maple tree

Did you know that the maple trees in Virginia produced sap, which can be made into maple syrup, just like the trees in New Hampshire and Vermont?

Did you ever wonder how maple syrup is made?

If the answers to these two questions peak your interest then you will want to visit the Old City Cemetery, in Lynchburg, VA, on Saturday, March 2nd, 2013, between the hours of 10:00 am until 12:00 pm.  The Cemetery’s historic grounds supervisor will be conducting a demonstration on how the century old maple trees, on the Cemetery grounds, are tapped and the sap is converted into maple syrup.  The maple syrup is then sold in the Cemetery gift shop throughout the year (very limited quantities, while supplies last!)

The sap is produced and tapped from trees at least 15 years old, or with a trunk at least 12-inches in diameter.  Beginning in early February, when the temperatures start to warm up but the nights are still below freezing, small splines are placed into the trunks about 2-inches deep and usually on either the left or right side of the tree.  The clear sap drips into bags which is collected until about the end of February.  Once a sufficient amount of sap has been collected the sap is boiled to a temperature of 219 degrees and is a light amber color.  From 2 gallons of sap about 1 cup of syrup is produced.

The Old City Cemetery is Lynchburg’s most visited tourist site.  The grounds are comprised of over 20,000 graves, most of which have long since lost their grave markers or headstones.  Beautiful during each of the four seasons, the winter months bring a sense of starkness, quiet and contemplation.  Great pictures can be taken throughout the Cemetery and will provide fabulous results.

Located at 401 Taylor Street, visit their website www.gravegarden.org for their calendar of events, directions or interesting facts and descriptions.

Come stay with us at the Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast and one morning you will delight in a 4-course breakfast featuring maple syrup!  Visit our website www.TheCarriageHouseInnBandB.com to check our availability calendar and book your room.  It’ll be a fun weekend!

 

Montpelier, James Madison’s Home

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I had the pleasure to visiting James Madison’s Montpelier, in Orange Virginia this week.  A magnificent house , on 2,700 acres (originally almost 5,000 acres), with commanding views of the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Virginia countryside.

James’ grandfather acquired the land and originally built a modest house for his family.  James was born March 16, 1751.  Between 1763 – 1765 James’ father, James Madison, Senior had Montpelier built one-third of a mile from the original family home at Mount Pleasant.  James attended the College of New Jersey (Princeton), served in the Continental Congress (1780-1783), participated in the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia (1787), drafted the Bill of Rights (1789-1797), was a member of the House of Representatives (1789-1797), served as Secretary of State under Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809), was our fourth President-elected for two terms (1809-1817), James died at Montpelier, June 28, 1836.

James married Dolley Payne Todd, September 15, 1794.  Together they added on to Montpelier as their family grew expanding the original house to the 22 rooms you see today.  The tour of the mansion includes the Drawing Room, filled with various pieces of art, the Dining Room, where the Madison’s entertained important and influential guests, the Presidential Library filled with books and maps, the room where James Madison died and Dolley’s kitchen, which is in the basement of the house.

The impressive grounds contain the family cemetery, where James and Dolley are buried, a slave cemetery, Mr. Madison’s Temple (built over the year-round ice house), and a 200-acre old-growth forest, along with sites where the slave quarters were, the blacksmith shop site, a formal garden and the farm complex.

Although this historic house and property is about 2 hours north of Lynchburg guests staying with us at The Carriage House Inn could easily combine a tour of this house with either Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello or James Monroe’s Ashlawn and learn about two or three of our founding fathers, their lives, beliefs and what life was like at the dawn of our country.  Additionally, Thomas Jefferson’s summer home, Poplar Forest is just 20 minutes from us.  —  Kathy