The Carriage House Inn B&B

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Archives: August 2015

Crisp, Lynchburg’s salad and juice & smoothie bar

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Crisp

Crisp, Lynchburg’s Salad, juice and smoothie bar in downtown

One of downtown Lynchburg’s newer restaurants is Crisp.

Crisp

They have some great salads at Crisp!

Located in the historic Allied Arts Building, an art deco building, at 725 Church Street, Crisp is Lynchburg’s first salad, juice and smoothie bar.  Serving lunch and dinner, either dine in or take out or let them deliver.  They also offer catering services.  Weather permitting they have a couple of tables for outdoor seating.

Crisp

Crisp is small but the best things come in small packages!

Their menu offers unique, personalized fresh salads, wraps, breakfast bowls and parfaits plus a daily soup and freshly squeezed juices and smoothies.  A variety of pre-made salads are available for those who need to “grab ‘n go”.

The standard make your own salad bar offers a variety of lettuces, four basic toppings and your choice of dressing.  You can enhance the standard salad by adding one or more of the 40 premium toppings, meats and salad add-ons available.

Hours are Monday-Friday between 10:30 until 8 and Saturday between 10 until 3.  If you have any questions or wish to pre-order your salad or warp their number is 434.363.6152.  Why not give them a try today?

Crisp

Art Deco style windows in Crisp.

Some guests staying at The Carriage House Inn Bed & Breakfast who are spending their day hiking or biking some of the areas wonderful trails have had us arrange a “to go” lunch for them from Crisp.  Everyone has complimented the lunch favorably.  They offer a healthy alternative to many dining establishments.

The Water Bearer

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Water Bearer

The Water Bearer

A reconstructed Water Bearer statue was unveiled at the official opening of Lower Bluff Walk last week.  Lower Bluff Walk is part of the city’s emphasis of a pedestrian walkway where residents and visitors of Lynchburg can stroll, gather, enjoy food and music and take in the sweeping views of the James River.

The historic, seven-foot tall, approximately 300-400 pounds, zinc statue was put on display at the Lynchburg city reservoir, at the corner of Clay and Seventh Streets in 1883.  The original Water Bearer was purchased from a catalog for $500.00 was the first public art in the city. and was to commemorate the opening of the city reservoir in 1829, after a dam was placed across the James River and a canal leading from the dam to the water wheel-powered pump station that supplied the water to the reservoir was completed.  The female figure, perhaps Egyptian, stood balanced on one foot with a large jug of water on her left shoulder.  By 2012 the Water Bearer lay broken in many pieces.  Stress fractures were found on the ankles after standing more than 130 years.

The statue’s reconstruction and its cost were hurdles the Lynchburg Historic Foundation were willing to tackle in order to bring a part of Lynchburg’s art history back to life.  After successfully raising $40,000 for the restoration project the real work began.

After carefully examining the original zinc water bearer it was decided that it couldn’t be repaired so the Foundation hired an artist to re-create the original statue using the original pieces as molds for the new bronze statue.   The artist from Alexandria, VA, who taught himself to sculpt,decided he would recast it in bronze, calling bronze “a forever metal”.

Working almost exclusively for 24 months, on this project, Ken Faraoni used a technique called “lost- wax casting”.  He created about 30 molds backed with plaster and poured casting wax into them.  Once he cleaned up the wax he took the pieces to Colorado where they were put together and a ceramic shell was created around the wax.  Liquid bronze was poured into the wax.  Once the bronze had cooled the ceramic pieces were hit with a hammer and the bronze recasting was left behind.  After smoothing out the recasting, a painstaking procedure, the final polishing was completed followed by a few coats of lacquer.  The statue was now ready to be displayed.

On a pleasantly warm, sunny day the recreated Water Bearer was unveiled to a large crowd of onlookers, who gasped when the beautifully recasted Water Bearer sculpture was revealed.  The statue is now a landmark of the work that the city of Lynchburg has accomplished in it’s revitalization and guides the way to the future of downtown.  Take the time to walk along Lower Bluff Walk.  Stop in one of the delicious restaurants for a meal or beverage.  Or just sit on a park bench and enjoy the view of Riverfront Park and the James River.

The Water Bearer is a pleasant walk from the Carriage House Inn B & B.  And once at the statue you can wander through downtown or onto Percival’s Island or the Blackwater Creek Trail.

Day Trip to Roanoke

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611 Train

See the 611 stored at the Transportation Museum

Roanoke, VA, about an hour west of Lynchburg, is a great spot to spend a day, while staying at The Carriage House Inn Bed & Breakfast.  The Roanoke Valley was settled in the mid-1740’s by tradesmen and farmers.  Towns formed within what is now the city of Roanoke during the beginning of the 19th century.  In 1882 the newly formed Norfolk and Western Railway joined with the Shenandoah Valley Railway, which started the rapid growth of Roanoke.  The Roanoke Valley is western Virginia’s center for industry, trade, health, education, travel and entertainment.

Choose from visiting the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Science Museum of Western Virginia, the Taubman Museum of Art, the History Museum of Western VirginiaMill Mountain Theater or the Grandin Theatre (see our blog post published 6/16/2015),  Explore one of the many delicious restaurants in the Square or the farmer’s market.

Two of our favorite places to visit are the O. Winston Link Museum and the Virginia Museum of Transportation.

The O. Winston Link Museum is located in Roanoke’s historic N & W Passenger Station.  Between 1955 until 1960, Brooklyn photographer Winston Link traveled throughout the mountains of Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina photographing and documenting the end of the steam locomotive era of the Norfolk and Western Railway.  The last major line to exclusively operate under steam power the photographs are striking, contemplative and amazing.  Over 2,400 images were captured during those five years.  More than 250 dramatic black and white and color photographs are displayed along with exhibits describing the history of the N & W Railway.  Artifacts, films, recordings, maps, dioramas, machinery and histories of the people who made up the N & W Railway along with people who lived along the railway line are displayed.  The “Live Storage area” is the chance to view photographs in the collection that are not currently on exhibit.

Located just a short walk from the O. Winston Link Museum is the Virginia Museum of Transportation.  The museum contains approximately 2, 500 objects and artifacts.  The crown jewel of this museums collection is the recently restored, refurbished and sometimes running Norfolk & Western Class J #611 Steam Locomotive.  We had the opportunity and pleasure to ride one of the 611’s runs between Lynchburg and Petersburg in June (see blog post published 6/1/2015).  What a exceptional way to spend a day, traveling as long ago across the countryside of Virginia.

The Virginia Museum of Transportation also has exhibits on cars and other vehicles dating back to 1904, an Aviation and Rail Gallery, along with examples of various train cars, locomotives, trucks, automobiles, buses, fire trucks and anything transportation.

The O. Winston Link Museum is located at 101 Shenandoah Avenue, N.E., 540.982.5465 or www.linkmuseum.org.  It is open Monday-Saturday 10-5 and Sunday 12-5.

The Transportation Museum of Virginia is located at 303 Norfolk Avenue, S.W., 540.342.5670 or www.VMT.org.

Both museums charge an admission fee.  Joint tickets are available for purchase.

With so much to see and do in Lynchburg and the surrounding areas you should add an extra day or two to your visit here.  Call 434-846-1388 to make your reservation or book on-line.

Zucchini Bread

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Zucchini Bread

Tasty zucchini bread

Each summer we grow a rather substantial garden in our back yard of The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast.  Items grown are often prepared and served during our 4-course breakfasts.  Among the items grown is zucchini.  Any of you who have ever grown zucchini knows that when it ripens, it ripens, and we usually have a bumper crop all at once.  What do you do with dozens of ripe zucchini?  We have made them into pancakes, fritters and the zucchini bread found here, in fact I have just finished making 18 loaves!  When you visit during Late-July or August you will probably be served something zucchini at least once during your stay.  Another twist is to take the zucchini bread batter and make them in muffin cups rather than loaves.  You may need to shorten the cooking time a little in the muffin cups.  They freeze great so you can freeze them and serve them later in the year.   Enjoy!

Zucchini Bread

Zucchini muffins cooling on a baking rack

  • Ingredients:  
  • 3 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 1/3 cup water
  • 2 cups grated zucchini (drained)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  •  1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

Directions:

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • In a large bowl combine flour, salt, nutmeg, baking soda, cinnamon and sugar.
  • In a separate bowl combine oil, eggs, water zucchini and lemon juice.
  • Mix wet ingredients into dry, add nuts and fold in.
  • Bake in 2 standard loaf pans, sprayed with nonstick spray, for 1 hour, or until a tester comes out clean.  Alternately, bake in 5 mini-loaf pans for about 45-50 minutes.

Helpful hints:  1.  Zucchini is a water-laden vegetable.  I found it made a better bread if allowed to drain after being grated.  Even just draining while you prepare the pans and combine the main ingredients seemed to help.  2.  I suggest you turn the pans around in the oven during the last 10-15 minutes of baking.  Baking time is dependent upon the wetness of the ingredients, so use your cake tester and bake until tester comes out clean.