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Barrel, Bottles and Casks Tours at Poplar Forest

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Poplar Forest

Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest

Again this year, Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest is presenting their Barrels, Bottles and Casks Tours.  The tours this year begin on March 24 & 25, 2017.

The popular tasting tours will focus on the beverages and spirits consumed at Poplar Forest during the cool spring months.  Guided tours will begin in the kitchen and progress through the house with stops for sampling different  beverages and the sharing of insights into the types of foods consumed by Jefferson and the enslaved residents of Poplar Forest.  A cellar-side whisky tasting will be presented by Virginia Distillery Company, along with light seasonal snacks.  On display in the Wine Cellar will be a special exhibition of kitchen and dining artifacts found during recent archaeological excavations on the grounds of Poplar Forest.

Tours will be conducted on both Friday, March 24 and Saturday, March 25, 2017 at 6:00 and 7:00 pm each evening.  This is a ticketed event.  Tickets can be purchased by calling the Museum Shop at 434.534.8120 or online at their website, www.poplarforest.org.  Tickets are $25.00.  Visitors under the age of 21 are welcome.

For more information call 434.534.8120.  Enjoy responsibly.

These tours will repeat on July 28 & 29, 2017 and October 6 & 7, 2017.

Apple Slaw for Winter

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Apple Slaw

Start with some colorful ingredients

Winter is winding down here in Central Virginia.  Luckily Lynchburg hasn’t had much snow this season.  When serving savory breakfast entrees this month, at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, we have been adding this crunchy and irresistibly sweet, tart and tangy side dish.  We are presenting this recipe during March as cabbage is plentiful and colorful.  It would be good any month of the year for a cookout, potluck or interesting salad.  What about serving it for a Saint Patrick’s Day celebration, it’s cabbage….just a bit different?

Apple Slaw

Cut up your ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1 very small purple cabbage, cored and thinly sliced and coarsely chopped, about 2 cups
  • 8 radishes, stems and ends removed, finely sliced and coarsely chopped
  • 2 medium Granny Smith apples, thinly sliced and coarsely chopped
  • loose 1/2 cup (total) chopped parsley and fresh mint
  • Salt and pepper to taste
apple slaw

Mix, dress, chill and serve our apple slaw

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the ingredients for the dressing: olive oil, mustard, honey and lime juice.
  2. Toss the chopped cabbage, radish and apple into the bowl.  Using your hands, thoroughly toss the chopped ingredients with the dressing.  Add salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Cover and chill for one hour.  Mix in the parsley and mint just before serving.  Best eaten within 1 day.

Almost Spring!?

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Spring Time and March Madness

We thought it was almost spring when the Saucer Magnolia burst into bloom just a couple of days ago…….

Then, two nights of a hard freeze (below 32°) and the blooms were gone……

Our guests were very distressed they did not get pictures on their own phones/cameras…….

So we are sharing ours…….

Let’s hope spring is on it’s way!

To celebrate the arrival of Spring we are having our March Madness Special. Stay three consecutive nights in March 2017 and one night is free.  To take advantage of this offer call us at 434-846-1388 and ask for our March Madness Special.  Can’t be combined with any other special or discount.  Gift cards can not be used with this special.

See you soon.

 

Old City Cemetery-The Chapel, Columbarium & Scatter Garden

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Old City Cemetery Chapel

Chapel and Columbarium at Old City Cemetery

Last January we started our series about Lynchburg, Virginia’s Old City Cemetery.  We have highlighted it’s buildings and museums, events and activities and what a treasure this unique spot is to Lynchburg.  This post will be our last in this series, but don’t fret, as special events or activities are hosted at Old City Cemetery we will feature them so that you might participate.

The Chapel is the Cemetery’s newest museum.  Completed in 2006 to mark the bicentenary of the Cemetery this unique and beautiful chapel is the perfect setting for weddings, memorial services, recitals, lectures and other special occasions.  The chapel honors religious leaders buried at the Old City Cemetery since 1806.  The building is modeled after two Central Virginia chapels.  Ivy Chapel Union Church has been replicated on the Cemetery grounds using almost all of it’s building materials from the Hermon Methodist Church in Appomattox, which was dismantled and transported to Lynchburg.  The pews, pulpit, piano, preacher’s chair and attendance bowl had been left in the decaying Hermon Methodist Church.  They are now safely housed in the Chapel.  Original light fixtures were reproduced.  A bell tower was added to the building.  The bell was especially cast by Whitechapel Bell Foundry in London, who had cast both the Liberty Bell and Big Ben.

On the lower level of the Chapel is the Columbarium.  Providing 288 niches and twelve crypts this very special room is a comfort to many who have a beautiful place to visit with their loved ones.  The focal point of the Columbarium is the terracotta “Peace” medallion set into the stone arch, a floor constructed of historic brick pavers from old sidewalks in inner-city Lynchburg and hand-rubbed German beech niche covers.  Both niches and crypts are available to the general public.

Adjacent to the Chapel and Columbarium you will find the Scatter Garden.  Since 1996 the scattering of cremated remains has been permitted in the natural dell that adjoins the Butterfly Garden and Lotus Pond.  When a beloved pet has died the ashes may be scattered within a garden setting on the bluff overlooking the Lotus Pond, Chapel and dovecote.

To learn more about the fees associated with the use of the Chapel and any of the various final resting places for loved ones please contact the Cemetery Office at 434.847.1465.  These locations are open daily from dawn to dusk, as are all of the Cemetery grounds.

Carbonara Frittata

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Carbonara Frittata

Carbonara Frittata

As most of you are aware The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast serves a 4-course breakfast each morning to our guests.  We alternate between a sweet entrée and a savory entrée, for a bit of variety and to appeal to both palates.  For February 2017 we are featuring a unique frittata, Carbonara Frittata.  What is a frittata?  It’s a quiche without the crust, making it an ideal menu item for those guests who are gluten-free.  This filling and delicious dish hits all of the right notes.  Prepare it for breakfast, brunch, lunch or even dinner.  It’s sure to please.

Carbonara Frittata served with toast and an apple-cabbage slaw

Ingredients:

  • salt
  • 1/4-1/3 pound spaghetti (regular or glutten free)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 lb. pancetta or guanciale, finely chopped
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 12 large eggs
  • 1/2 cup each grated Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino Romano cheeses
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped
  • fresh basil leaves mixed with baby arugula

Directions:

  1. Position a rack in the upper third of the oven; preheat to 425°
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil for the pasta.  Salt the water, add the pasta and cook until a few minutes shy of al dente, about 6 minutes; drain.
  3. In an ovenproof skillet, heat the oil, three turns of the pan, over medium-high heat.  Add the pancetta and cook, stirring often, until beginning to brown, about 2 minutes.  Add the garlic and pepper and stir until aromatic, about a minute.  Mix in the pasta; season with salt.
  4. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, cheeses and milk.  Pour over the pasta, shaking the pan to settle the egg mixture into the pasta.  Baked until puffed and cooked through, about 15 minutes.

Serve frittata hot or at room temperature, topped with small handfuls of the herbs and greens.

Serves 4-6.

 

“Nat Turner’s Bones: Reassembling an American Rebel” a lecture

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Nat Turner’s revolt

Lynchburg, Virginia’s Jones Memorial Library is hosting a lecture on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 5:00 pm.  This lecture will discuss the archaeological search for the remains of a Virginia slave, Nat Turner.

Who was Nat Turner?  Born on October 2, 1800, in South Hampton County, Virginia, Nat Turner made history as the leader of one of the bloodiest slave revolts in America.  He was born on the Virginia plantation of Benjamin Turner, who allowed him to be instructed in reading, writing and religion.  As a small child Nat was thought to have a special talent because he could describe things that happened before he was born.  He was deeply religious and spent much of his time reading the Bible, praying and fasting.  As he grew older he believed he received messages from God through visions and signs in nature.  In 2016, his story was told in the movie, Birth of a Nation.

Nat Turner

Nat Turner in the movie Birth of a Nation in 2016

In 1825 Nat had a vision of a bloody conflict between black and white spirits.  Three years later he had another.  In 1831 Nat interpreted a solar eclipse as a sign that it was time to rise up.  He recruited several other slaves to join his cause.  On August 21, 1831 Nat and his supporters began their revolt against white slave owners with the killing of the Travis family.  He gathered more supporters, growing to a group of over 50 slaves, as he and his men continued their violent killing spree through the county.  Nat fled and hid in the woods.  While he was hiding white mobs took their revenge on the blacks in Southampton County, killing between 150-200 slaves.  Nat was captured and tried.  Although he pled not guilty he was sentenced to death by hanging, which was carried out on November 11, 1831.

The rebellion was one of the bloodiest and most effective in American history.  The incident put fear in the heart of southerners, especially Virginians, ending the organized emancipation movement in that region.  Southern states enacted even harsher laws against slaves instead.  Nat’s actions added fuel to the abolitionist movement in the north.  The rebellion is said to have expedited the coming of the Civil War.

Here are 10 things you may want to know about Nat Turner as shown on the History Chanel.

The lecture will be conducted by Dr. Kelley Fanto Deetz.  He will discuss the life of Nat Turner, the rebellion and the search for Nat Turner’s remains.  This lecture is free and open to the public.  It will take place at Jones Memorial Library, 2311 Memorial Avenue, on the second floor, at 5:00 pm.  For more information contact the library staff at 434.846.0501.