The Carriage House Inn B&B

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Events

Amherst County Mill Tour

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#brightwell mill

Brightwell Mill

The Amherst County Museum and Historical Society will be hosting a tour of various mills and mill sites found in Amherst County, VA.  Wear comfortable shoes as there will be hiking to some of the mill sites.

The Mill Tour will take place on Saturday, April 9, 2016.  A car pool group will meet at the Amherst County Museum (154 South Main Street) at 9:00, sharp.  The tour is being led by Chris Anderson, known as “Mr. Mills”.  Mill sites will include Amherst Mill–the only continuously operating mill in Central Virginia, two Campbell Mills, Pedlar Mill, Valley View Mill, Myers Mill, the Miller’s House and Stapleton Mill.  Some of these mill sites are standing, others are in ruins.  The tour will conclude about 1:00.  Bring a bagged lunch, snack and a drink to eat in the car while traveling between mills.

#Amherst Milling Company

Amherst Milling Company, one of the stops on the Mill Tour

To get on the tour list please call the Amherst Museum, 434.946.9068.  In the event of rain, the Mill Tour will take place on April 16th.

“The Amherst County Museum and Historical Society is a nonprofit educational organization whose mission is to discover, collect and preserve objects related to the history and genealogy of Amherst County, VA.”  The society conducts lectures, tours, exhibits, workshops  and more throughout the year.  To join the society  call the museum 434.946.9068 or visit their website www.amherstcountymuseum.org.

Stay with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast for 2-or more nights, the weekend of April 8 & 9, 2016 and we will provide you your bagged lunch.  Call us 434,846.1388 to discuss room availability and rates.

The J 611 Rides Again!

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611 steam Train

Ride the 611 Photo by Casey Thomason, Norfolk Southern Corporation

The Virginia Museum of Transportation is pleased to announce that the Norfolk & Western J 611 steam passenger locomotive will have another run.

The powerful and sleek Class J passenger locomotives were designed and built in Roanoke, VA in 1950 by the Norfolk & Western Railway.  They were known as the finest steam passenger locomotives in the world.

The first trip in 2016 will be hosted by the North Carolina Transportation Museum.  Using the Norfolk Southern rails it will run on Saturday, April 9 from Spencer, NC to Lynchburg, VA and return, on The Virginian.

On May 7 and 8 the 611, The Powhatan Arrow, will return to Roanoke to run half-day excursions from Roanoke to Lynchburg and back, following the Blue Ridge grade.

Seating options on all of the excursions include coach, first class and dome cars.  A dining car and observation car will also be available.

Last year, June 14, 2015, we traveled on the 611 between Lynchburg and Petersburg (see blog post dated June 1, 2015.)  The train ride was something to experience along with the scenery between the two stops.  Last year all seats sold out in record time, so if you’re interested in this unique train trip make your reservation early.

For more information contact the Virginia Museum of Transportation at 540.342.5670 or click here for the schedule and costs.  It’s a mode of travel like none other.

I’ll Never be Hungry Again

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The Renaissance Theatre, in downtown Lynchburg, VA, is presenting the hilarious, side-splitting musical comedy spoof of Gone With the Wind, entitled “I’ll Never Be Hungry Again.”  

Named after Scarlett O’Hara’s famous declaration and line in the movie this play follows David, a black graduate student, who discovers Gone With the Wind is required reading for his Southern lit class at the University of Michigan.  As many students do, David puts off reading the book until the night before a test only to realize the book has more than 1,000 pages!  He attempts to speed read the book, but falls asleep where he finds himself on the plantation home of Starlett–not Scarlett–O’Hara, trapped as a character int he book he has come to despise.

The small black box atmosphere at Renaissance Theatre is the perfect backdrop for this musical.  An extremely fast-paced production plus over-the-top costumes and exaggerated sound effects keeps the actors and audience enthralled and involved in the story line.  Mike and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

This play will be performed on February 26, 27  and 28 plus March 3, 4 and 5, 2016 at Renaissance Theatre.  Located at 1022 Commerce Street parking can usually be found on the street or in the parking lot just across from the theatre.  Tickets can be purchased at etix.com or by calling 434.845.4427.  But don’t delay, previous shows were all sellouts!

Staying with us at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast while to enjoy this delightful, yet thought provoking play, we will serve you a southern-style breakfast of Shrimp and Grits if you’d like.  Just request this special breakfast entree’ when calling 434.846.1388 to book your reservation.     

 

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“To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade”

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Virginia and the American Slave Trade

The American Slave Trade

The Lynchburg Museum is currently showcasing a traveling exhibition from the Library of Virginia entitled “To Be Sold: Virginia and the American Slave Trade.”

The centerpiece of the exhibit is a painting by Eyre Crowe, a British artist, called “Slaves Waiting for Sale, Richmond, Virginia,” painted in 1861, it depicts the moments just before a slave auction is held in Richmond in 1861.  Crowe’s three paintings (reproduced on panels for the traveling exhibit) show different aspects of the domestic slave trade that began in the early 1800’s.  “After the Sale: Slaves Going South” (1865) documents what came next for the slaves.

The first African slaves came to Virginia in 1619, when the tobacco industry was booming.  By the 1800’s Virginia wasn’t growing as much tobacco leaving more slaves than work.  Some slave owners began selling their slaves (about 600,000–the largest forced migration in U.S. history) to those in the Deep South (“sold South”) where the slaves would help meet the demand for cotton labor.  Richmond became a “slave-collecting and re-sale center,” the largest slave-trading center in the Upper South.  It is estimated that in 1857 the slave trade in Richmond was $4 million dollars (more than $440 million today.)  The slaves sold were transported by ship, rail or overland in groups that often numbered over 300 people.  The end of the journey was often New Orleans, the largest slave-trading city in the U.S.

In addition to the panels the exhibit showcases slave history items from the Lynchburg Museum collection–the deeds of manumission from John Lynch giving his slaves their freedom in 1782, items found during archaeological digs where the homes of Thomas Jefferson’s slaves at Poplar Forest were located, and a letter from a slave to Elijah Fletcher, father of Indiana Fletcher who founded Sweet Briar College.

You can view this exhibit at the Lynchburg Museum, 901 Court Street, until March 6, 2016.  The Museum is open Monday through Saturday between 10 until 4 and Sunday between noon until 4.  Admission to the Museum is free.

An African American genealogy workshop and lecture will be held at the Community Room of the Lynchburg Public Library on February 19 at 2 pm.  This workshop and lecture are being sponsored by the Legacy Museum of African American History.

The Lynchburg Museum is a short distance (walking distance) to The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast.  

 

Lynchburg Museum Quilt Exhibit

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The Lynchburg Museum currently has an exhibit displaying 20 quilts made between 1802 and 2010.

Quilting in America started as a necessity.  Quilts were used as bed coverings or hung over doors or windows to keep the cold out.  Early quilts were usually either plain or whole quilts (three pieces of solid materials quilted together like a sandwich) or patchwork quilts (using various scraps of fabric).  Applique quilts became popular in the mid-1800’s as the availability of more materials allowed “show” quilts to be sewn, not just “utility” quilts. Quilt making became an expression of artistry and skill.  Grandmothers and mothers made applique quilts for their children or grand children.  These were often passed down from one generation to the next.

Quilting bees were an important social activity, as women and girls came together to work on a collective quilt or an individual one.  While quilting they shared stories of their lives and taught essential skills to the girls.

The quilts on display are a combination of historic and modern pieces.  The 1869 crib quilt is of particular note.

The Lynchburg Museum is located at 901 Court Street.  It is open Monday-Saturday 10-4 and Sunday 12-4.  Their phone number is 434.455.6226.  The museum is free to all visitors.

The 1855 Greek revival Court House is one of Lynchburg, Virginia’s most recognizable buildings.  It features a prominent temple façade supported by four massive Doric columns.  The building remained in continuous use as a court house between May 1865 until December 1974.  It opened as the Lynchburg Museum in 1977.

The guest rooms in the mansion, at The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, are all covered with quilts.  Kathy’s mother made the quilts we use today.  When you are staying with us be sure to ask to see all of the quilts, we are very proud of them.

Old City Cemetery Art Exhibit

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