The Carriage House Inn B&B

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Recipes

Breakfast Bake

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Breakfast Bake

Breakfast Bake-one pan cooking and easy cleanup.

The breakfast bake is an easy recipe that involves only one pan (baking sheet) for a complete breakfast.  This makes clean up real easy.  Follow the directions below.  Everything is cooked in the oven, including the egg! It makes the ideal breakfast when you have a bunch of people over for breakfast.  The egg holds everything together.  Enjoy the breakfast bake.  Above we used diced potatoes.  You could use hashbrown potatoes instead.

Ingredients:

  • 8 slices of thick cut bacon
  • 2 medium red potatoes, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound asparagus, trimmed
  • 6 eggs
  • 18 cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • salt and pepper

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 475°.
  2. Place diced potatoes, olive oil and garlic in a plastic bag.  Shake until fully coated.  Pour potatoes onto one side of a large rimmed baking sheet (they should be bunched together on about 1/4 of the pan.)
  3. Fill the other side of the same baking sheet with bacon.  Bake in oven 10-12 minutes until bacon is fully cooked.
  4. Place bacon and potatoes onto a paper towel to absorb excess grease.  Discard grease from baking sheet, but do not wipe clean.  There should be a thin layer of grease remaining.
  5. Line the same baking sheet with the asparagus and tomatoes.  Top gently with eggs and bake for 6-7 minutes or just until the whites are set.
  6. Spread the potatoes and bacon back onto the baking sheet.  Bake for an additional 2 minutes.
  7. Once out of the oven sprinkle with parsley, salt and pepper.

Serve and enjoy.  Serves 6.

Sunrise Smoothie

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Sunrise Smoothie

A smoothie is a great way to get some needed nutrients at breakfast, lunch or as a snack during the day.  At The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast we oftentimes serve a “smoothie shot” as our first course when serving a sweet breakfast entreé.  Guests love them and it’s a nice way to begin your breakfast.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup chopped ripe strawberries (about 5 large)
  • 1 cup chopped seeded watermelon
  • 1 cup chopped peach
  • 1 cup raspberry sorbet
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

Directions:

Place the strawberries, watermelon, peach, sorbet and orange juice in a blender.  Puree until smooth and creamy.  Add more orange juice if you like it a little less thick.  Serve immediately in tall glasses with straws.

Makes 2 servings.

**we serve our smoothies in shot glasses, so we dilute the mixture a bit to make it easier to get out of a small glass.

Mexican, Egg and Tortilla Chip Scramble

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Mexican, egg and tortilla chip scramble served with a soft taco on the side.

We’re celebrating Cinco De Mayo this month at The Carriage House Inn Bed & Breakfast, in Lynchburg, Virginia.  As most of you know by now, we alternate a savory and a sweet entrée each morning for our guests.  This month we will be serving this egg scramble as our savory entrée.  Come stay with us and experience a slightly different take on scrambled eggs.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 poblano chile pepper, seeded and diced
  • 1 bunch scallions, sliced
  • 1 red jalapeño pepper, halved, seeded and thinly sliced
  • ½ cup fresh corn kernels
  • kosher salt
  • 8 large eggs
  • 4 cups corn tortilla chips, slightly crushed
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, torn, plus more for topping
  • diced avocado, sour cream and pico de gallo, for topping

Directions:

  1. Melt butter in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat.  Add the poblano, scallions and jalepeño; cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly softened, 1-2 minutes.  Add the corn and ¾ teaspoon salt; cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft, about 2 more minutes.
  2. Whisk the eggs with ¼ cup water and ½ teaspoon salt in a large bowl.  Add the eggs to the skillet and cook, stirring constantly with a rubber spatula to form large curds, until the eggs are softly scrambled, about 2 minutes.  Add the tortilla chips, ¾ cup cheese and the cilantro to the skillet; cook, stirring, until well combined, 1-2 more minutes.
  3. Sprinkle the scramble with the remaining ¼ cup cheese and top with avocado, sour cream, pico de gallo and more cilantro.

Serves 4-6

Helpful Hints:

  • It is suggested you have all of your ingredients prepped, measured and ready to go before you start the actual cooking process.  This recipe moves rather quickly once you start cooking.
  • All peppers “heat” are found in their ribs and seeds.  You can adjust the spiciness of the peppers in this recipe if it sounds too spicy.
  • We used 1 fresh ear of corn to produce ½ cup corn kernels.  We added a bit more than the suggested measurement.
  • We added about 1/2 cup of browned mild Italian sausage.  It adds a bit more flavor plus a meat protein to the dish.  You can use Spicy Italian sausage if you’d like.
  • We serve this savory breakfast entrée with warm corn tortillas, fresh from the garden sliced tomatoes and a combination of warm black beans and corn.
  • Go crazy and serve a Margarita!

 

 

“Food To Live For”

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Food to Live For Cookbook

As our blog followers know, last month I posted an entry entitled “Food To Die For” which was a synopsis of Jessica Bemis Ward’s first cookbook for Lynchburg’s Old City Cemetery.  Today I want to expose you to her second book, Food To Live For We’re Alive and Cooking.

It took Jessica almost ten years to compile and write her second cookbook.  After the huge success of her first she and the wonderful staff and volunteers at Old City Cemetery knew she needed to write a follow-up.

Food To Live For concentrates on the foods prepared for gatherings of family and friends, as did Food To Die For.  The recipes in Food To Live For celebrate daily meals as well as celebrations, birthdays, holidays, dinner parties and spur of the moment suppers among neighbors and friends.  Just reading the table of contents to review the categories of recipes included will make your mouth water.  Appetizers, soups and chowders, salads-including main dish salads, main courses and of course desserts.  Speaking of desserts, there are six recipes for all things chocolate!

As before, sprinkled throughout the book are helpful hints, tips, sayings, musings and wonderful pictures from various members of the Old City Cemetery staff and volunteers.  Some of these will make you chuckle.  Others will remind you of your mother or grandmother.  Others still will prod you into action.  The pictures throughout the book add to the stories of the gravegarden, the people who reside there and there lives before.  Several pages speak of “cooks in the gravegarden.”  Personally I find it interesting to know more about some of the people who are buried at Old City Cemetery.

Food To Live For is available for purchase at Old City Cemetery, 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg, VA 24501.  434.847.1465. www.gravegarden.org.  Proceeds from this book also benefit the cemetery and it’s education programs, tours, maintenance and growth.  Old City Cemetery is always an interesting place to visit, no matter the month, season or weather.  If you haven’t visited this special place yo are long overdue.

 

Hawaiian Pancakes

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Hawaiian Pancake

Hawaiian Pancakes, moist and very tropical.

While thumbing through a cooking magazine recently there was an article about Masaharu Morimoto, an Iron Chef on the Food Network show, Iron Chef America, stating his favorite breakfast was a pancake with pineapple, coconut and macadamia nuts.  Having lived in Hawaii for three years in the 1960’s I never had pancakes with these tropical ingredients, but I do enjoy each ingredient individually so I decided to create a recipe with these three ingredients and I’m calling it Hawaiian Pancakes.  First I took our Ultimate Buttermilk Pancake recipe and altered it a bit.  When we lived in Waialua, our neighbor worked at a sugar mill and would always bring us bags of what we called “raw sugar” so I changed the white ganulated sugar to Turbinado.    Next, get a fresh pineapple (it tastes so much better than canned pineapple) and you will use macadamia nuts and shredded or flaked coconut as the toppings.

  • 2 Cups all-purpose flour
  • 3 Tablespoons of raw sugar (Turbinado)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 Cups buttermilk-room temperature
  • 2 eggs-room temperature-separated
  • 2 Tablespoons melted unsalted butter

To the Buttermilk Pancake recipe above you can alter or add the following ingredients to make them “Hawaiian”

  • add 1 teaspoon coconut extract
  • add 3 heaping tablespoons of shredded coconut to the batter
  • add 1/3 cup diced, fresh pineapple chunks to the batter
  • top with a few fresh pineapple chunks, as a garnish
  • top with 1/3 cup toasted macadamia nuts, as a garnish
  • top with 1/3 cup toasted shredded coconut or coconut flakes, as a garnish

Sift the dry ingredients together in one bowl (flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, pineapple chunks and shredded coconut).  In a second bowl whisk together the wet ingredients (buttermilk, eggs yokes, coconut extract and melted butter).  Keep the two mixtures separate until you are ready to make the pancakes. Whip the egg whites to stiff peaks then gently blend to the combined ingredients before cooking

Heat a griddle or frying pan to medium heat.

Pour the wet mixture into the dry mixture and mix using a fork or wooden spoon.  Mix until just blended together (it will be lumpy).  Do NOT over blend the mixture.  Let the batter sit for 15 minutes before cooking.  ADD THE EGG WHITES NOW. Using a scoop (I use an ice cream scoop)  pour the batter on the griddle or frying pan.  Brown on both sides and serve with butter and maple syrup.  This recipe should serve five or six people.  If you are making them in batches you can preheat the oven to 200 degrees and store the cooked pancakes in the oven on the shelf until you have cooked all of them and are ready to serve them (will keep well in the oven for 30-45 minutes).

Top with pineapple chunks, macadamia nuts and coconut.  Serve with syrup.

We have had several return guests ask us to make these pancakes for them again.  Yes, they are that good!  And who doesn’t hope that winter is finally over and you can dream of sunny and war, Hawaii?  I’s sure you will enjoy our Hawaiian Pancakes.  They are moist, fluffy, light and soooo much more.

“Food To Die For”

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Food to Die For Cookbook

Many of you who read our blog posts, from The Carriage House Inn Bed and Breakfast, know of and have visited Old City Cemetery, in Lynchburg, VA.  A unique spot in Lynchburg, it obviously started out as merely a cemetery.  Funeral customs in the 1800’s encouraged family, friends and others to spend time in the cemetery “visiting” the departed, sharing picnic space with the departed, caring for the gravesites and enjoying a place of peace and beauty.

Today Old City Cemetery is visited in much the same way.  Every time we visit there are people walking the grounds, visiting the various grave sites, enjoying the roses, trees and plantings, taking time for quiet reflection at the fish pond, swinging in the giant swing hanging fro the pecan tree or learning about the cemetery by visiting the village of small museums or participating in a tour.

The book Food To Die For A Book of Funeral Food, Tips and Tales, by Jessica Bemis Ward was first published in 2004.  Published as a fund raiser, 100 percent of the cookbook’s profits have benefitted the cemetery.  Initially the profits were allocated toward the building of the cemetery’s chapel and columbarium, which were completed in 2006.  Since it’s first publication more than 16,000 copies of the cookbook have been sold, raising funds for various projects throughout the cemetery.

The more than 100 recipes found within the pages of the cookbook are for comfort foods, the types of dishes taken to bereaved families or relatives.  Chapters include casseroles, main dishes, soups, vegetables and side dishes, breads and desserts.  The recipes were gathered from various sources, including local cooks, friends and relatives of Jessica’s, along with many from Jessica herself.

In addition to the delicious recipes the book is full of practical information.  How to write an obituary. Writing condolence notes and thank you’s for funeral food.  Advice pertinent to funeral food: send food in a non-returnable container, include a copy of the recipe along with your dish, along with reheating instructions.  Extra advice: two small pans are better than one large one, how to keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold and many other useful tips and hints.

We have enjoyed reading and studying this book.  There are several recipes we have used, both at the B & B and in our “normal” life.  Be sure to try the Blueberry Bundt Cake, the Classic Chicken Tetrazzini (great for leftover Thanksgiving turkey), or Jane White’s Corn Pudding (which is very similar to Mike’s Grandmother’s recipe she passed down to me.)

Strangely enough this book makes for an interesting read, even if you are not looking for a recipe to help comfort someone you know that has experienced a loss.  Next month you will find a blog post written for the companion book Food To Live For We’re Alive and Cooking.

Both of these books can be purchased at the Old City Cemetery Visitor Center.  They each cost $25.00, with all proceeds remaining at the cemetery.  Old City Cemetery is located at 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg, VA 24501.  434.847.1465 or www.gravegarden.org.